Song Sketch

Ghar Aaja Ghir Aaye – Chhote Nawab – Clouded Craving

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DIRECTOR’S CUT
S A Akbar ( Chhote Nawab )

The very talented son of S D Burman, Rahul Dev Burman had composed his first tune when he was 9 years old ! Ai meri topi palat key aa which was used by his father in a film called Funtoosh… Then he composed the famous Sarr jo tera chakraaye in Pyaasa
But when the nineteen year old Pancham was signed by Guru Dutt for his film called Raaz, his father was against the idea of R D Burman becoming an independent music director so early. He wanted his son to wait for a few years. R D Burman was adamant, so, the senior Burman called up all the well-known lyricists of that time and warned them not to work with his son. Shailendra reasoned with Burman da and finally convinced him that Pancham was capable of handling the music of a whole film on his own.
Two wonderful songs were recorded for Raaz.. both written by Shailendra. Unfortunately Raaz was never released.
Mehmood had decided to turn producer with a film called Chhote Nawab. He wanted S D Burman as music director. S D Burman refused, saying he was too busy, so Mehmood decided to sign R D Burman for the film. Shailendra would be writing all the songs for Chhote Nawab. The film is about an innocent man who suddenly gets rich and how, his innocence gradually fades away. The director, S A Akbar had heard the two songs that Pancham-Shailendra had recorded for ‘Raaz’. He fell in love with one of them and asked Pancham to re-record the song with Lata Mangeshkar.
The situation is quite unique for the song….
Mehmood is in a kotha with his friend (Anwar Hussain). It is the nautch girl who sings the song, BUT, the words are what his beloved, alone at home, would be singing.
The way the first shot is conceptualised and shot, I am left wondering how this director called S A Akbar remains unknown. It is a shot that would make the best of directors proud. On the strumming of a sitar, we see Mehmood and his friend. Mehmood wants to leave, but the friend holds him back. The girl (Sheila Vaz) enters the frame and the focus shifts to her face. She sings –

Ghar aaja, ghir aaye,
Badraa saanwariyaa..

The focus shifts back to Mehmood, he likes what he sees and hears.
The rhythm picks up as the girl sings the full ‘mukhdaa’
The rhythm is ( In Western Classical ) called 7/8 timing…. Seven notes to a bar…. Some of the most popular Hindi Film songs are based on this rhythm pattern….Think of songs like O basanti pawan paagal, Piya tosey naina laagey rey….and the great Jaidev – Sahir song Allah tero naam
All you need to do is count 1-2-3, 1-2-3-4…. Try it….
Coming back to the song….
The ‘mukhdaa’ :

Ghar aaja ghir aaye badara sanwariya,
Mora jiya dhak dhak rey chamake bijuriya….

Shailendra has set the mood and the ‘mausam’ for the song….Romance…. Rains are a great boost for romance….. If you are with someone you love…. GREAT….If you are alone, you pine for the one you love.
A beautifully crafted interlude….. Sitar and Taar shehnaai…. (Dakhina da )
The visuals are of the woman who loves him (Ameeta ) in
an empty house….
Shailendra literally stabs the heart with his words in the verses….

Soona soona ghar mohey,
Dasney ko aaye rey,
Khidkee pey baithey baithey,
Saari raiin jaye rey,
Tupp tipp sunata main toh bhayi rey baanwariya…..

Another interlude which is divided in visuals between the two women. Mehmood seems to be enjoying the dance now… wife/ lover forgotten.

Kass mass jiyaraa,
Kasak mori dooni rey,
Pyaasi pyaasi ankhiyon ki,
Galiyaan hain sooni rey,
Jaaney, mohey laagi kiss bairan ki nazariyaa….

Shailendra drives the knife right home….The director moves between a lonely, empty house and a well-decorated ‘kothaa’…..Shailendra is the seasoned campaigner, but, the young R D Burman gives you a glimpse of what he will do in the near future….But honestly…. this director impresses me….Selecting a song like this for the situation is in itself great….He justifies it with his shooting and editing….
R D Burman has arrived….
But Shailendra’s tupp tipp is something that is unforgettable…

1 Comment

  1. Pingback: Carnival of Blogs on Golden Era of Hindi Film Music – April 2019 – The world is too small? or Is it?

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